Have You Seen These

Humanity Road on Twitter Verify twice tweet once – misinformation, old news an_2015-06-03_18-47-58

About chiefb2

Retired fire chief,Type 3 AHIMT IC, PIO. Current industrial services safety professional, social media emergency management disciple (no, I'm not a "guru"). Crisis communications consultant. Dad with an open wallet.
  • Brian Humphrey

    Chief,

    You and your readers may find this recent Poynter article of interest:

    http://www.poynter.org/news/mediawire/338503/despite-downturn-journalists-eschew-use-of-press-releases/

    Clearly, there is a need for change (hopefully with a strong focus on quantifiable improvement) in every vocation, industry and institution. While I wince at the statements attributed to The Squamish Chief, I fear the most important take away for emergency public information (EPI) could be overlooked by those on both sides of the issue.

    The rise in direct information management (DIM) must never be seen as a way or reason to “bypass” the appointment (traditional) media – or any other industry or institution. Rather, the availability of DIM, including its strengths and weaknesses must serve as an inspiration to every broker or middleman to add value to the information they have, do or can receive.

    There are many, dare I say countless, ways to add such value. Some happen in the blink of an eye, while others are part of the “long tail” of any incident, event or issue.

    Regretfully, within the appointment media and also among many who actually use (and among a far greater number who just loudly espouse) digital EPI, there is a obsessive and monocular focus on speed as THE defining value.

    Certainly speed or lack thereof is one of the larger, easily understood and measured elements of both traditional and digital EPI, but it is an unhealthy obsession [great emphasis] on either side of the equation.

    IMHO, the Squamish Chief was wrong to whine, and any of us wrong to suggest anything other than the paper lacks strategy – and probably has for a long time. When everyone else is serving up fast food hamburgers, the last thing a small town needs is another hamburger stand. Yet that is what they have confined themselves to being. Their irrelevance and pending demise has precious little to do with social media / digital EPI, but rather their intransigent sense of self.

    While I largely concur with your article, the takeaway for me? Many in, and far more who merely espouse DIM are themselves in danger of becoming a digital Squamish Chief unless they begin to have a constant laser-like focus on overall communication strategy.

    That’s my personal U.S. $0.02 YMMV 😉

    Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

    Brian Humphrey